1 month ago
This raises a question about the order of events in design. Design is a path-dependent process. That means the early moves constrain the later moves. Think about the cycle. On the very first iteration the design possibilities are wide open. The designer defines some screens and workflows and then the programmer builds those. On the next iteration, it’s not wide open anymore. The new design has to fit into the existing design, and the new code needs to fit into the existing code. Old code can be changed, but you don’t want to scrap everything. There is a pressure to keep moving with what is already there. Our early design decisions are like bets whose outcome we will have to live with iteration after iteration. Since that’s the case, there is a strong incentive to be sure about our early bets. In other words, we want to reduce uncertainty on the first iterations.

Ryan Singer

1 month ago

I was putting together some new content for the marketing pages on ooomf.com and I threw together some new styles that represent the direction we’re trying to move to for the future (we have a few cool announcements coming up!). While I was at it, I developed an OOCSS framework for making responsive pages quickly, without touching any CSS. I’ll hopefully get around to open-sourcing that at some point soon.

In a week, we restyled everything on the front-side of the site, made everything responsive, developed a new wordpress blog for our super popular science-based posts, and split our marketing styles from our app styles.

My favourite part of the redesign was the blog. It’s heavily inspired by Medium (is there any other way to make a blog now? They solved the content-first blog design so well..), but with a few nice departures. Specifically, the post page blends our beautiful Unsplash photography with the post content. Check everything out. We’ll be continually updating the front-side of the app in the future, so things will likely change.

ooomf-blog

ooomf-blog-post

1 month ago
There are very few endeavors focused on involving adults in science. The vast majority focus on getting kids into science, as they absolutely should. But, these endeavors view converting children into a career in science as the ultimate horizon goal. There’s a complete void when it comes to adults. Once you’ve chosen a career outside of science, you are forever lost to the science world. The focus on you ends. You’re considered an unfortunate statistic. Somehow overnight you went from being “the future” to being a “loss” on the science scoreboard. We abandon those supposed “futures” the moment they choose a career outside of science and continue to overlook them for the decades to come.

Ariel Waldman

3 months ago
It is a funny thing about life: we honor the sacrifices of our forebears not by doing precisely what they would choose for us at that moment, but by following the spirit of them wanting us to be happy. We do not do the bidding they would prescribe for us a generation away, but instead by doing what they might choose for themselves if they were our age. If they’ve done well by us and we by them, perhaps we accomplish more each generation as we go.

Andy Dunn, CEO of Bonobos

3 months ago
What a strange thing multi-generational struggle is. One generation’s work and sacrifice creates over-confidence and perhaps hubris in the next.

Andy Dunn, CEO of Bonobos